seeingpractice

bloggingvetschool:

Owls are just full of hot air

Well, not quite, but the majority of an owl’s head is feathers. These feathers not only provide insulation, but;

They act as sonic dishes! The two hemispheres of feathers on either side of an owl’s face are arranged, not to look direct your attention to their most flattering features, but to direct sound to their ears.

Without the external ears that many mammals have (think of a dog or cat pricking its ears in the direction of a sound), the nocturnal owl needs a way of picking up as much sound as possible. These ‘satellite dishes’ pick up sound accurately enough to help a barn owl like the one above zero in on a mouse scurrying away in extremely low light.

veterinaryrambles
veterinaryrambles:

This hamster was presented for humane euthanasia due to weakness, paralysis, and a large swollen abdomen.  Its forelimbs were unaffected but its hindlimbs could only move weakly and with spasticity.  After euthanasia I performed a necropsy.  2-3mL of serosanguinous fluid was found free in the abdomen, which is an awful lot for a hamster!  The photo below the syringe shows the reproductive tract of the hamster pulled out of the abdomen; you can see huge fluid-filled ovarian cysts present at either end of the T-shaped uterus.  But the biggest problem the hamster had was the photo showing my hand, which shows a firm white mass between my fingers.  All organs were accounted for, but this mass arose independently of them.  It may have originated from an adrenal gland or from tissue surrounding the spine.  If it infiltrated or arose from the spine, that would account for the hamster’s paralysis.
I made an impression smear from the mass and got these peculiar cells.  I’m not great at organ cytology/histology anymore, so if anyone has any guesses as to what that is, I’d be much obliged!  To me it reminds me of neural tissue with the matrix and the prominent purple nuclei, but I could be entirely off base.

veterinaryrambles:

This hamster was presented for humane euthanasia due to weakness, paralysis, and a large swollen abdomen.  Its forelimbs were unaffected but its hindlimbs could only move weakly and with spasticity.  After euthanasia I performed a necropsy.  2-3mL of serosanguinous fluid was found free in the abdomen, which is an awful lot for a hamster!  The photo below the syringe shows the reproductive tract of the hamster pulled out of the abdomen; you can see huge fluid-filled ovarian cysts present at either end of the T-shaped uterus.  But the biggest problem the hamster had was the photo showing my hand, which shows a firm white mass between my fingers.  All organs were accounted for, but this mass arose independently of them.  It may have originated from an adrenal gland or from tissue surrounding the spine.  If it infiltrated or arose from the spine, that would account for the hamster’s paralysis.

I made an impression smear from the mass and got these peculiar cells.  I’m not great at organ cytology/histology anymore, so if anyone has any guesses as to what that is, I’d be much obliged!  To me it reminds me of neural tissue with the matrix and the prominent purple nuclei, but I could be entirely off base.